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Larry Light Dials In On Domino’s Success in 2020

In Larry’s latest piece in Forbes, Domino’s Six ‘Can-Do’ Actions Lead To Increased Sales, he lays out the 6 critical actions to Domino’s 2020 success.

Read his latest thoughts now, here.

Larry Light’s Forbes Column Roundup

Larry Light’s latest pieces in Forbes have collectively been read by over 54,780 readers. They cover an array of marketing topics including the impacts of Covid-19, Ease of Choice, and more.

See his latest headlines below.

Macy’s And The 100th Anniversary Of The 19th Amendment

At this 100-year anniversary for women’s right to vote, we should be respecting brands that stood up for women, especially working women Macy’s is one of those brands.

Six Rules To Plan Now For The Post-Coronavirus World

When the economy starts up post-coronavirus, many brands will need to be reenergized. How to plan now for post-coronavirus revitalization?

What’s Next For The Whole Foods Market Brand?

Amazon is focused on building Whole Foods Market into a trusted source for organic, healthful, eco-conscious, ethically-sourced offerings with a reputation for quality, leadership, and trust. The singular desire is to build loyalty to Whole Foods Market rather than sharing it with the “365” brand.

In This Complicated Uncertain World Ease Of Choice Wins

Right now, why add more uncertainty to our lives by selecting an unknown or new brand? This is not a time for new brands. It is a good time to build on the strength of brand familiarity and trust.

After The Quarantines, We May All Sell And Buy Used Cars The Carvana Way

Carvana is turning the used car business on its head and in doing so has the potential to utterly change the way car dealers do business. As with Uber, Tesla, Airbnb, Amazon that forced established brands to change, Carvana is causing a sea change in one of the most ubiquitous industries in the US.

To Innovate and Generate Market-Winning Brands, Change The Culture

In his latest piece in Forbes, Arcature CEO Larry Light explains why brands must adopt Internal Marketing to create and reinforce a cultural commitment to the new direction. 

Read his latest piece now for some valuable insight and practical tips: The Do’s And Don’ts Of Mindset Change

You can follow Larry Light on Twitter here: @CEOLarryLight

Advertising, Brand Impact And More In Larry Light’s Forbes Column

In Larry Light’s recent Forbes pieces, he takes on the marketing mindset that ignores the true brand impact of advertising as well as the laziness of today’s ad creation.

Marketers Ignore True Brand Impact At Their Peril

Marketers are confusing “clicks and listens” to buying. Marketers seek reliable data on how many people have viewed or heard particular advertising messages. The “view/hear mindset” is captivating for marketers. Clicks feed egos. [Read This Piece]

Lazy Advertising Thinking Is A Deadly Sin

Enterprises that own multiple brands have the opportunity to reach different customers with the same needs and the same customers with different needs over all the stages of their lives. Each of the brands in a brand portfolio has a relevant, differentiated promised experience that receives added trust and authority from the corporate parent. [Read This Piece]

See Larry’s Forbes Column here and follow him on Twitter here.

Larry Light in Forbes: “Instagram And WhatsApp Will Not Be Able To Fix Facebook’s Image”

Facebook can’t rely on Instagram and WhatsApp to fix it’s image problem. Read why in Larry Light’s latest piece in Forbes. Click here.

Larry Light asks “Is This Your Grandfather’s Harley-Davidson?” in Forbes

Has Harley-Davidson met its Oldsmobile moment? The venerable motorcycle brand faces the deleterious consequences of demography. On the one hand, Harley continues to be reliant on the defining mood, spirit and discretionary spending of Baby Boomers (think Marlon Brando’s outlaw motorcycle 1953 film, The Wild Ones, Jack Nicholson and Dennis Hopper in the 1969 film Easy Rider, and the hauntingly sad Rolling Stones Altamont concert). Today, many Baby Boomers are aging out of the motorcycle lifestyle.

Is This Your Grandfather’s Harley-Davidson? Forbes.com

Read the rest of Larry Light’s piece now! Click here.

The Mass Middle of the Market is Muddling its Way Into the Future

The village of Tupper Lake, NY, in the Adirondack Park has a population hovering just under 6000. In the short summer season tourists and second-home owners boost that number. Recently, there has been a seasonal gentrification with the opening of two craft breweries, but it is basically a struggling place to live. Tupper Lake is a small town 130 miles southeast of Montreal, Quebec, and 89 miles south of Cornwall, Ontario. In Tupper Lake, there is a Dollar General, a Save-A-Lot, a Family Dollar, and a Day Wholesale.

Read the rest of Larry Light’s latest LinkedIn piece here.

Read Larry Light’s Latest Forbes Piece “I’m Ford And I’m Proud”

From the piece: “Ford Motors Company is under a microscope these days. James Hackett, CEO, is continually being scrutinized. Wall Street finds his Ford vision and strategy inscrutable. So, in order to make itself clear, last October Ford introduced a new campaign. The message is “Built Ford Proud”. It is a self-praise message highlighting Ford’s 115-year history of commitment to building great vehicles and communicates Ford’s ambition to lead in the future through smart vehicles for a smart world.”

Read the rest here: I’m Ford And I’m Proud

NEW RULE FOR BRAND ORGANIZATIONS

The phrase “Be a runway, not a control tower” popped up a few of years ago in a Singapore newspaper. The phrase is a great way to put a frequent brand organization occurrence: the resistance to change.

For brands to be successful in the ongoing challenge to remain contemporary, the idea is not to oppose change but to drive it.  Change happens all the time. Today it is almost impossible to keep aware of everything that changes around your brand. The digital advertising business has to deal with technologies, devices, and apps that change so much faster than people adopt and adapt.

Yet, opposition to change happens. Employees may fear how change will alter their jobs. They may think that what has been the current methods of operation should continue to be the standard operating procedure. Or, they are very happy and complacent and see no need to change.

Change initiatives usually come with a detailed program, an HR course, a set of slides, a video, a script, an app, a dictionary, a metric (or series of metrics), out of-office seminars, and in many cases a slew of young, junior consultants who take up a lot of office space. For many brands with change in leadership there is also a change initiative: new person, new ideas.

A brand’s culture sometimes can be the control tower keeping everyone on course, and focusing on avoiding any and all risk. Brands flourish in supportive organizational cultures. If the organization is risk averse or closed to change, it creates an inflexible and relevancy-resistant environment.

Brands must stay relevant. This requires change. Continuing to do the same old things when the world is dynamic is a formula for failure. The biggest challenge that brands face is ensuring that brand teams are open to change, and that the organizational environment is conducive to change. In organizations undergoing change, for that change to be genuine and not superficial, cultural change initiatives must be consistently reinforced, widely communicated, supported from the top of the organization, and realistic for the organization’s current situation.

Brands are dynamic, active promises about what they will do for the customer. Brands do not do well where the control tower effect is in place. Brands need continuous renewal. Brand teams must be aware and alert to marketplace changes and anticipatory ideas for satisfying customer needs. With too much control tower, without the continuous renewal of innovation or renovation, a brand will stagnate. The business will stagnate. Enduring profitable growth requires building a continuous renewal cycle.

When there is a misalignment and conflict between the brand strategy and the brand culture, the culture prevails over the strategy. Culture always wins. Brands need supportive, flexible cultures. If the culture is inactive and risk averse, in other words, a control tower closed to change, the misalignment is serious.

Brands need the runway. But, this does not mean there are no brand boundaries. Every runway is a well-defined pathway. Skidding off the runway is no good. Taxiing outside the boundaries of the runway is dangerous. Staying within the lane but being able to have change take flight is in a brand’s best interests.